Aircraft

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BAC Jet Provost Mk 52  (Ground attack export version of the Mk 4)

Construction Number PAC/W/23905, ex RAF Serial XS228, SAAF (S. Yemen) Serial 104, Singapore AF Serial 352gprov-1214

Role and Equipment

The only Mk 52 Jet Provost still flying, G-PROV is a light ground attack export version of the Mk 4 trainer and is a true combat veteran. The aircraft has full dual controls and two sets of flight instruments, VOR / DME system and Garmin 250 GPS coupled to Skymap GPS moving map. Martin Baker Mk 4 ejection seats with PSP (Personal Survival Pack) containing dinghy and various survival aids. Fully functioning and certified main and emergency oxygen systems.

Leading Particulars

Length: 32 ft 5 in (9.88 m)

Span: 36 ft 11 in (11.25 m)
Max Takeoff Weight: 8355 lbs (3788 kgs)
Engine: Rolls Royce Viper 202 rated at 2450 lbs thrust
Max Speed Dive: 400 kts IAS (460 mph) or 0.73 M
Max Speed Straight and Level ( ~ 23,000 ft): 345 kts (397 mph)
Max Speed Straight and Level (sea level): 322 kts (371 mph)
Max Rate of Climb (Sea Level): 4000 ft/min
Time Sea Level to 25,000 ft: 9.5 mins
Service Ceiling: 36,500 ft
Takeoff Roll (sea level, nil wind, 20°C): 1570 ft (478 m)
Landing Roll (sea level, nil wind, 20°C): 2010 ft (792 m)

History

PAC/W/23905 was built by BAC in Warton in 1964 as a Mk 4 aircraft and delivered to the RAF as serial number XS228. However, the aircraft was retained in a maintenance unit and returned to BAC in 1967 and modified to Mk 52 standard as a ground attack aircraft for export. The aircraft served with the South Arabian Federation (South Yemen) Air Force as serial number 104 where it saw active service and sustained minor combat damage during operations. In December 1975 it was transferred to the Singapore Air Force where it served as serial number 352. Superceded by the BAC 167 Strikemaster, the aircraft was withdrawn from service in late 1980 before being sold to a British company in 1983. It is the only Mk 52 still flying.

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BAC Jet Provost T Mk 5P

Construction Number PAC/W/23907, ex RAF Serial XS230Provost-7029

Role and Equipment

A basic jet training aircraft with full dual controls as used by the RAF from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. VOR navigation along with a Garmin 150 GPS coupled to Skymap GPS moving map. Martin Baker Mk 4 ejection seats with PSP (Personal Survival Pack) containing dinghy and various survival aids. Pressurised cockpit and fully functional main and emergency demand oxygen system.

Leading Particulars

Length 33 ft 8 in (10.26 m)
Span: 35 ft 2 in (10.72 m)
Max Takeoff Weight: 8200 lbs (3719 kgs)
Engine: Rolls Royce Viper 202 rated at 2450 lbs thrust
Max Speed Dive: 400 kts IAS (460 mph) or 0.73 M
Max Speed Straight and Level (~ 22,000 ft): 370 kts (426 mph)
Max Speed Straight and Level (sea level): 355 kts (409 mph)
Max Rate of Climb (Sea Level): 4000 ft/min
Time Sea Level to 25,000 ft: 9.8 mins
Service Ceiling: 36,700 ft
Takeoff Roll (sea level, nil wind, 20°C): 1420 ft (432 m)
Landing Roll (sea level, nil wind, 20°C): 2010 ft (612 m)Provost-8349

History

Like its close relative above PAC/W/23907 was built by BAC in Warton in 1964 as a Mk 4 aircraft. After delivery to the RAF as serial number XS230 it was also retained in a maintenance unit and returned to BAC sometime in the late 1960’s. The airframe was then used as a basis for creating a new model with a larger and pressurised cockpit, demand oxygen system and higher low level speed. This was to become the Mk 5 and PAC/W/23907 was one of two Mk 5P (prototypes) built. It was returned to the RAF in 1967 (still wearing serial number XS230) and was tested extensively at the RAF Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down, Wiltshire prior to the production Mk 5 aircraft entering service with the RAF. On completion of trials the aircraft was kept at Boscombe Down and used for the next 25 years as a spin trainer with the Empire Test Pilots School making its last military flight on 14th July 1993. The aircraft was officially retired from RAF service in 1994. The aircraft was then used for a time as one half of the Transair display team before being transferred to the International Test Pilot School in 1998. Unfortunately this is the only one of the two prototypes to survive in complete airworthy condition.

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